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Thursday, August 18, 2011

Making Math Memorable #3

(This is the third post in a series...click here for post 1 and here for post 2)

First up, one of my favorite games - I Have, Who Has? The game is great for fast computation and listening skills. A student is given a card with a number, statement, and question on it. The first card and second card in a deck might look like this: 

The great thing is that they also exist for language arts, social studies, and science too! 

printables:















When I was in first grade, my teacher made us fact circles that we wore, pinned to our shirts all day to help us remember our fact families. We were randomly asked ours and we could see everyone else's all day. She used the die cut machine to make them, so I guess that's why they were circles instead of triangles. A third grade teacher could use the triangles for multiplication like I do. Here are some that I bought for centers. This is from a multiplication/division set. Trend also makes them for addition and subtraction. I always tell my students to picture the triangle as the roof of the house with 4 people in it so they remember to write four number sentences.













Here are a few free printable worksheets for fact families:

24 Game is a game I like to give my students as a center. I use the single and double digit packs for addition and subtraction and multiply / divide depending on what grade level I'm teaching. There are also ones for fractions and decimals, integers, algebra, and exponents!




Here's the back of the multiply / divide box:


For this card, the target number is 10. I have to decide which circle has numbers that I can use to make 10 by adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing, or any combination of those.
As you can see, there is one white dot on the card, meaning it's the easiest type of problem in the pack.

 This one is tougher - you can tell by the 2 red dots and the fact that there are 3 numbers in each circle.
Does the solution make sense to you? There are actually 2 for the same circle this time.

See all Making Math Memorable Posts:

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